Exercises to improve your knee strength

What is causing your knee pain?

Arthritis, meniscus tear, worn away cartilage all give you knee pain – RIGHT?  Err no.

Recent research concluded that arthritis, tears or cartilage damage can be prevalent without pain.  Knee pain is not necessarily a direct result of disease or damage. Knee pain is more predictable with an imbalance in muscles around the knees.  Muscles pulling the knee in various different, awkward positions.

The research scanned over 900 people and over 60% of them were found to have signs of arthritis, tears within the knee joint and cartilage problems but no knee pain.

This lead researcher to believe that the structural problems within your knee are not the cause of knee pain. Instead, it is caused by the pull of the muscles around the knee.   Imbalances are common. I see scary squats in class, when the inner thigh is weaker than the outer thigh, causing the knee to drop into each other.  Strengthening your inner thigh will help to rebalance your knee and alleviate pain.

The second big imbalance is between the thigh muscle known as the quads and your hamstrings on the back of your leg.  Your hamstrings tend to get shorten and pull excessively on the knee cap causing compression and pain around the knee cap. Alternatively, the hamstrings tighten and pull on the lower back causing back issues.

 

Don’t miss: What do you need to bring to a Pilates class?

 

Before you reach for the pain relief medication that ends up causing bowel and gut issues, consider improving the strength of your muscles around your knees. Consider these exercises before you opt for the surgery

Exercises to strengthen your knees

I have put together 3 videos in a series to help you to increase your muscle strength around your knee. Here is the first one knee recovery exercise video

What else can you do to increase your joint mobility?

Drinking more water will lubricate your joints, making them glide smoothly. Plus simple, cleansing and detoxifying water. is the BEST thing you can be drinking to benefit your body to detoxify, re-hydrates tissue and boosts circulation. Find out my top tips on drinking more water here.

If you would like to practise Pilates in the comfort of your own home click here

Any questions or comments email me adele@get-gorgeous.com

 

9 responses to “Exercises to improve your knee strength”

  1. Dolores Mulkerrins says:

    Just had a quick look at the knee video and it’s great. Going to do it daily to help relieve pressure on hips. Am recommending Chris does it daily to relieve his painful knees. Also his mum who suffers form knee pain.Well done and keep them coming.

  2. Glynis says:

    Brilliant video for knees. Made me realise how tight my hamstrings really are!!

  3. Helen says:

    I’ve had a go at this this afternoon- my knee has been moving from a bit niggly to really quite sore this last week so I think it’s just what I need. I confess it felt tough on my hamstrings – I’m wondering if I’ve built my quads and outer thigh too much in contrast to my hamstrings by doing a lot of cycling but I’m going to do it every day for a week and report back. Thanks Adelex

    • Adele Adele says:

      Hi Helen, you are thinking like a true athlete well done. Working your hamstrings as well as your quads, to compensate for the cycling is a brilliant deduction. Let me know how you get on and if you feel a difference, Adele x

  4. Jill Whitehouse says:

    Thank you , Adele, so much for responding to my challenge to produce a knee exercises video. Now we have 3. And very good they are too. I have been slipping the stretches and exercises into my day and am feeling the benefit.
    Great to have an expert on had to help.
    Love your class
    Jill

  5. Beverley says:

    Hi Adele

    I just wanted to say a HUGE thank you for pointing me in the direction of your knee exercises video. After 2 years and 4 months of pain in my left hip/leg/knee and ankle, I am now – at last – virtually pain free. And it’s all because I’ve started following your exercise video. You were quite right, the pain in my leg – which had started to localise in my knee – was a result of an imbalance in the muscles. Those exercises have worked wonders. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    What I want to know is, how come a whole raft of NHS experts (hip consultant; spine consultant and three sets of physiotherapists) – assisted by X-Rays, bone density scans and an MRI scan – couldn’t come up with the diagnosis, but you could? You’re a miracle worker. You deserve a medal!

    Am a very happy bunny. Look forward to seeing you next week, with renewed vigour!

    Love, Beverley

    • Adele Adele says:

      Hi Beverley

      I am so pleased that you are a happy Bunny 🙂

      You did the hard work and you have been consistent. Thank you so much for taking the time to write those kinds words honey. It is interesting I was listening to a business podcast this week where the chap was discussing customer service and how the industry looks at the one point of contact rather than the whole business and his analogy was anatomy. He said he worked out a lot and as result of that and 18 months of pain he had two big knee operations. The pain continued so he went to see a biomechanics expert who told him the pressure on his knees were a result of hip displacement and shoulder out of alignment. The knees were taking the brunt of his misplacement.

      I am a big advocate of working as many muscles around the body as possible so that we can take the pressure off knees and shoulders. I am currently suffering from a minor hip bursitis, so today I have stretched and worked and pulled all my thigh, quads and bum and everything I can think of around the hip to release the pressure.

      Eventually it will all appear to be common sense, it seems at the moment the ‘profession’ tend to look at the point of pain rather than the holistic approach.

      Adele x

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